An analysis of a letter from birmingham city jail by martin luther king jr

Where were they when Governor Wallace gave a clarion call for defiance and hatred. In your statement you assert that our actions, even though peaceful, must be condemned because they precipitate violence.

If his repressed emotions are not released in nonviolent ways, they will seek expression through violence; this is not a threat but a fact of history. Something within has reminded him of his birthright of freedom, and something without has reminded him that it can be gained. But I must confess that I am not afraid of the word "tension.

Whites bombed black homes and churches, and blacks retaliated with mob violence. Who is their God. If this philosophy had not emerged, by now many streets of the South would, I am convinced, be flowing with blood. Before the pen of Jefferson etched the majestic words of the Declaration of Independence across the pages of history, we were here.

We bring it out in the open, where it can be seen and dealt with. But the latter consistently refused to engage in good faith negotiation. I began thinking about the fact that I stand in the middle of two opposing forces in the Negro community. Can any law enacted under such circumstances be considered democratically structured.

But though I was initially disappointed at being categorized as an extremist, as I continued to think about the matter I gradually gained a measure of satisfaction from the label. Consciously or unconsciously, he has been caught up by the Zeitgeist, and with his black brothers of Africa and his brown and yellow brothers of Asia, South America and the Caribbean, the United States Negro is moving with a sense of great urgency toward the promised land of racial justice.

I commend the Catholic leaders of this state for integrating Spring Hill College several years ago. Connor and his policemen have been rather nonviolent in public, as was Chief Pritchett in Albany, Georgia, but they have used the moral means of nonviolence to maintain the immoral end of racial injustice.

Letter from Birmingham City Jail Summary

They have languished in filthy, roach infested jails, suffering the abuse and brutality of policemen who view them as "dirty nigger-lovers. The letter reveals King's strength as a rhetorician and his breadth of learning.

Whatever affects one directly, affects all indirectly. If I have said anything in this letter that overstates the truth and indicates an unreasonable impatience, I beg you to forgive me.

I say this as a minister of the gospel, who loves the church; who was nurtured in its bosom; who has been sustained by its spiritual blessings and who will remain true to it as long as the cord of life shall lengthen.

In this sense they have conducted themselves rather "nonviolently" in public. The nations of Asia and Africa are moving with jetlike speed toward gaining political independence, but we still creep at horse and buggy pace toward gaining a cup of coffee at a lunch counter.

Just as Socrates felt that it was necessary to create a tension in the mind so that individuals could rise from the bondage of myths and half truths to the unfettered realm of creative analysis and objective appraisal, so must we see the need for nonviolent gadflies to create the kind of tension in society that will help men rise from the dark depths of prejudice and racism to the majestic heights of understanding and brotherhood.

Boutwell will be reasonable enough to see the futility of massive resistance to desegregation. Yes, I love the church. Others have marched with us down nameless streets of the South.

It has taken Christianity almost two thousand years to accomplish what it has. Society must protect the robbed and punish the robber. Like a boil that can never be cured so long as it is covered up but must be opened with all its ugliness to the natural medicines of air and light, injustice must be exposed, with all the tension its exposure creates, to the light of human conscience and the air of national opinion before it can be cured.

In those days the church was not merely a thermometer that recorded the ideas and principles of popular opinion; it was a thermostat that transformed the mores of society. In no sense do I advocate evading or defying the law, as would the rabid segregationist.

Individuals may see the moral light and voluntarily give up their unjust posture; but, as Reinhold Niebuhr has reminded us, groups tend to be more immoral than individuals. We merely bring to the surface the hidden tension that is already alive. Consciously or unconsciously, he has been caught up by the Zeitgeist, and with his black brothers of Africa and his brown and yellow brothers of Asia, South America and the Caribbean, the United States Negro is moving with a sense of great urgency toward the promised land of racial justice.

Analysis of Martin Luther King’s Letter from Birmingham Jail “Letter from a Birmingham Jail’ was written by Martin Luther King in the year This was an open letter written by Martin Luther King from a Birmingham jail in Alabama, where he had been imprisoned for participating in the arrangement and organization of a peaceful protest.

Letter From Birmingham Jail study guide contains a biography of Martin Luther King, Jr., literature essays, quiz questions, major themes, characters, and a full summary and analysis. Study Guides Q & A. Martin Luther King Jr.’s Persuasion in “Letter From Birmingham Jail” After being arrested and imprisoned in Birmingham Jail, Martin Luther King Jr.

Letter from the Birmingham Jail Quotes

wrote one of his most famous works to the people of Birmingham, titled “Letter From Birmingham Jail on April 16, Analysis of Martin Luther King’s Letter from Birmingham Jail.

Analysis of Martin Luther King’s Letter from Birmingham Jail “Letter from a Birmingham Jail’ was written by Martin Luther King in the year Letter from the Birmingham Jail Quotes Showing of 25 “Injustice anywhere is a threat to justice everywhere.

We are caught in an inescapable network of mutuality, tied in a single garment of destiny. The Letter from Birmingham Jail, also known as the Letter from Birmingham City Jail and The Negro Is Your Brother, is an open letter written on April 16,by Martin Luther King Jr.

The letter defends the strategy of nonviolent resistance to racism.

An analysis of a letter from birmingham city jail by martin luther king jr
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